Service Learning & Outreach

Parker School’s Service Learning & Outreach Committee provides our community with information on ways parents, students, and teachers can get involved and support our local and international communities through service projects, cross-cultural education experiences, current in-classroom events, and school-wide fundraisers. Teachers work closely with the Parent Group to build community meaningful ways. Here are some of the ways we reach out…

 

The Fabretto Foundation

Parker School has a close partnership with The Fabretto Foundation, an organization dedicated to “empowering children and their families in Nicaragua to reach their full potential and improve their livelihoods through education and nutrition.” Fabretto, started as an orphanage over 60 years ago and now serving over 12,000 children, has given our staff an amazing opportunity to volunteer teach and mentor teachers during the summertime in Managua, Nicaragua.

With an interest in learning about the local community, education system, and ways to support the organization through a cross-cultural collaboration, Parker teachers integrated a rich educational environment with an open-ended learning philosophy. Children were invited to explore materials, build self-esteem, collaborate, self-regulate, and engage in play. With a focus on building relationships with educators, students, colleagues, and gaining a deeper understanding of Fabretto’s organization, our relationship with Fabretto is proving to be a mutually beneficial and enriching partnership.
Learn more about The Fabretto Foundation.

IMG_4098.JPG

 

Adopt-a-Family & Project Night Night

Every year, Parker School reaches out to families in our community to provide a joyful holiday season for those who may not be able to afford one. For many years we’ve worked with Compass Family Services and their Adopt-a-Family program, to partner with a family in need who would otherwise be unable to have any sort of gifts for the holiday season. For many of the families who participate in the program, these gifts are the only ones they will receive all year. Many of our sponsor families are homeless or living in low-income housing and we feel grateful that we’re able to make a small difference in their lives.

We have also partnered with Project Night Night in order to reach out to more children in need. Project Night Night helps provide a tote bag for homeless children in the city. The totes include an age-appropriate children's book, a lovey or stuffed animal, a new blanket, and any other personal nighttime items – flashlights, toothbrushes, pajamas, etc. – that our families may choose to contribute.

Our desire is to keep these Service Learning opportunities age-appropriate and relevant to our children, and so we speak openly about the projects and missions in our classrooms and encourage our families to make their children an active part of the learning process.
Learn more about Adopt-A-Family
Learn more about Project Night Night

 

Food Drive

Years ago, Parker School held its annual Food Drive in December. But since that’s such a busy time already, we did a little research and found that the SF/Marin Food Bank is actually overrun with donations that time of year. When do hungry families really need the food? When the holiday blitz dries up in February. So each February, Parker families come together to collect food to benefit needy families and fill some empty bellies.
Learn more about the SF/Marin Food Bank

 

Book Drive

In conjunction with the Children's Book Project, Parker School holds an annual book drive in May. The Children’s Book Project distributes gently used books to schools, hospitals, shelters and individuals in need. It is a wonderful chance to discuss the ideas of giving and helping others in need with your children.
Learn more about the Children's Book Project

“Communities maintain some practices and change others through the contributions of specific individuals and of other communities. While they transform, they also maintain some fidelity to long-standing values.”
— Rogoff, 2003